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Spring Budget 2023



Jeremy Hunt announced his second fiscal statement and first Budget since becoming Chancellor against a backdrop of fragile public finances, an ongoing cost of living crisis, and increased Government borrowing.


In January, the Chancellor appealed to the nine million ‘economically inactive’ people in the UK, specifically retirees, claiming: “to those who retired early due to the pandemic, or haven’t found the right role after furlough, I say Britain needs you.”


Ahead of time, then, we expected the Chancellor’s speech – dubbed the ‘back to work Budget’ by the media – to focus on the Government’s economic priorities: halving inflation, growing the economy, and reducing national debt.


With a surprise surplus of £5.4 billion in January due to record self-assessment tax payments, and year-to-date borrowing undershooting the Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) forecast by £30.6bn, the question has been whether Hunt would pay off some of what the UK owes, or funnel it back into the economy.


With that in mind, the Chancellor’s speech highlighted a plan of two halves: a series of short-term measures designed to provide immediate support to businesses and households, and a longer-term strategy for growth.


But how does his Budget stack up against the Government’s priorities – and what does it mean for people and businesses across the UK?


RP Spring-Budget-march23-orange
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